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English

English is one of the 'core' curriculum subjects. Every effort is made at Farley to ensure that each child reaches their full potential in English to enable them to take full advantage of all other subjects offered.

There are four main strands to the English Curriculum:

  • Speaking and Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation

Speaking and Listening is undertaken individually, in groups, and as a whole class. Our ultimate aim is to improve confidence so all children can contribute in class or whole-school assemblies. The ability to speak clearly, using appropriate language, in a variety of situations is something we constantly strive for.

A child needs to be able to read fluently and with understanding at an early age. Children are encouraged to read, listen to and discuss many different types of fiction and non-fiction. This is done individually, in groups, and as a whole class. We encourage books to be taken home and we ask your help in hearing your child read as often as possible. Each class will examine a number of class readers throughout the year. The choices available to each year group often have an underlying theme; these may relate to issues the children may encounter in life or have covered in their Creative Curriculum lessons. An example of this is "Goodnight Mr Tom" by Michelle Magorian which relates to the Year 6 topic, WW2.

The school uses the Read, Write Inc scheme to teach phonics, spelling patterns, handwriting and sentence construction. The programme is particularly aimed towards lower key stage two. However, some children who need to continue the programme do so throughout upper key stage two.

Once a child is a competent reader written work is less onerous. We use numerous strategies in order to encourage children to write more freely and confidently unaided. Extended writing sessions are incorporated into the timetable and all children are taught to write across different genres; fiction and non-fiction. We use the Nelson scheme of work for handwriting, once the Read, Write, Inc programme has finished, which ensures progression throughout the school. Children to use BLUE pens only. We encourage children take a pride in their work and its appearance and to always strive to do their best.

 

Programme of study (statutory requirements)

SPOKEN LANGUAGE

Pupils should be taught to:

  • listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and build vocabulary and knowledge
  • articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • give well-structured descriptions and explanations
  • maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • participate in discussions, presentations, performances and debates
  • gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.
Years 3 and 4

 

Years 3-4 programme of study (statutory requirements)

READING
Word reading

Pupils should be taught to:

  • apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology) as listed in Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet
  • read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.

READING
Comprehension

Pupils should be taught to:

  • develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
    • listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
    • reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
    • using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read
    • increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally
    • identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books
    • preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action
    • discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination
    • recognising some different forms of poetry (e.g. free verse, narrative poetry)
  • understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by:
    • checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context
    • asking questions to improve their understanding of a text
    • drawing inferences such as inferring characters' feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
    • predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
    • identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these
    • identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning
  • retrieve and record information from non-fiction
  • participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

WRITING
Transcription

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them
  • spell further homophones
  • spell words that are often misspelt
  • use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary
  • write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.

Handwriting

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use the diagonal and horizontal strokes that are needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined
  • increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting, e.g. by ensuring that the downstrokes of letters are parallel and equidistant; that lines of writing are spaced sufficiently so that the ascenders and descenders of letters do not touch.

Composition

Pupils should be taught to:

  • plan their writing by:
    • discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar
    • discussing and recording ideas
  • draft and write by:
    • composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures
    • organising paragraphs around a theme
    • in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot
    • in non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices such as headings and sub-headings
  • evaluate and edit by:
    • assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements
    • proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, e.g. the accurate use of pronouns in sentences
  • proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors
  • read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.

Vocabulary, grammar and punctuation

Pupils should be taught to:

  • develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:
    • extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, e.g. when, if, because, although
    • using the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause
    • choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition
    • using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause
    • using fronted adverbials
    • learning the grammar in column 1 of year 3 and 4 in Appendix 2
  • indicate grammatical and other features by:
    • using commas after fronted adverbials
    • indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe with singular and plural nouns
    • using and punctuating direct speech
  • use and understand the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 accurately and appropriately when discussing their writing and reading.
Years 5 and 6

 

Years 5-6 programme of study (statutory requirements) 

READING
Word reading

Pupils should be taught to:

  • apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology), as listed in Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet.

READING
Comprehension

Pupils should be taught to:

  • maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
    • continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
    • reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
    • increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions
    • recommending books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices
    • identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing
    • making comparisons within and across books
    • learning a wider range of poetry by heart
    • preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience 
  • understand what they read by:
    • checking that the book makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context
    • asking questions to improve their understanding
    • drawing inferences such as inferring characters' feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
    • predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
    • summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas
    • identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning
  • discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader
  • distinguish between statements of fact and opinion
  • retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction
  • participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously
  • explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary
  • provide reasoned justifications for their views.

WRITING
Transcription

Spelling

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use further prefixes and suffixes and understand the guidelines for adding them
  • spell some words with ‘silent’ letters, e.g. knight, psalm, solemn
  • continue to distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused
  • use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and understand that the spelling of some words needs to be learnt specifically, as listed in Appendix 1
  • use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words
  • use the first three or four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a dictionary
  • use a thesaurus.

Handwriting and presentation

Pupils should be taught to:

  • write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed by:
    • choosing which shape of a letter to use when given choices and deciding, as part of their personal style, whether or not to join specific letters
    • choosing the writing implement that is best suited for a task (e.g. quick notes, letters).

Composition

Pupils should be taught to:

  • plan their writing by:
    • identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
    • noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
    • in writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what they have read, listened to or seen performed
  • draft and write by:
    • selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
    • in narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
    • précising longer passages
    • using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
    • using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader (e.g. headings, bullet points, underlining)
  • evaluate and edit by:
    • assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
    • proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning
    • ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing
    • ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register
    • proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors
    • perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

Vocabulary, grammar and punctuation

Pupils should be taught to:

  • develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:
    • recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms
    • using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence
    • using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
    • using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility
    • using relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that or with an implied (i.e. omitted) relative pronoun
    • learning the grammar in column 1 of year 1 in Appendix 2
  • indicate grammatical and other features by:
    • using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing
    • using hyphens to avoid ambiguity
    • using brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
    • using semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between main clauses
    • using a colon to introduce a list
    • punctuating bullet points consistently
  • use and understand the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 accurately and appropriately in discussing their writing and reading.
Word list for years 3 and 4

accident(ally)
actual(ly)
address
answer
appear
arrive
believe
bicycle
breath
breathe
build
busy/business
calendar
caught
centre
century
certain circle
complete
consider
continue
decide
describe
different
difficult

disappear
early
earth
eight/eighth
enough
exercise
experience
experiment
extreme famous
favourite
February
forward(s)
fruit
grammar
group
guard
guide
heard
heart
height
history
imagine
increase
important

interest
island
knowledge
learn
length
library
material
medicine
mention
minute
natural
naughty
notice
occasion(ally)
often
opposite
ordinary
particular peculiar
perhaps
popular
position
possess(ion)
possible
potatoes

pressure
probably
promise
purpose
quarter
question
recent
regular
reign
remember sentence
separate
special
straight
strange
strength
suppose
surprise
therefore
though/although
thought
through
various
weight
woman/women 

Word list for years 5 and 6

accommodate
accompany
according
achieve
aggressive
amateur
ancient
apparent
appreciate
attached
available
average
awkward
bargain
bruise
category
cemetery
committee
communicate
community
competition
conscience*
conscious*
controversy
convenience

correspond
criticise (critic + ise)
curiosity
definite
desperate
determined
develop
dictionary
disastrous
embarrass
environment
equip (–ped, –ment)
especially
exaggerate
excellent
existence
explanation
familiar
foreign
forty
frequently
government
guarantee
harass
hindrance

identity
immediate(ly)
individua
linterfere interrupt
language
leisure
lightning
marvellous
mischievous
muscle
necessary
neighbour
nuisance
occupy
occur
opportunity
parliament
persuade
physical
prejudice
privilege
profession
programme
pronunciation
queue

recognise
recommend
relevant
restaurant
rhyme
rhythm
sacrifice
secretary
shoulder
signature
sincere(ly)
soldier
stomach
sufficient suggest
symbol
system
temperature
thorough
twelfth
variety
vegetable
vehicle
yacht